eSchool News

eSchool News
eSchool News covers the intersection of technology and innovation in education.
  • Recorded Webinar – Access Granted: Access Control Checklist for 2015
    Learn about the best practices to keep you ahead of the curve this year when it comes to your access control investment: . • Future-proofing with HD: Cover more area with fewer cameras to maximize your investments while keeping shoppers safe and secure • Business intelligence tools: Leverage an open system and integrate it with retail video analytics and POS technologies, to gain insight into shopping patterns and consumer data • Subtle Security: Learn about discreet surveillance options that can provide better coverage at a lower price point • Multi-site management: Implement a multi-site architecture, using a range of powerful yet compact cutting-edge appliances, to manage every store from a single location
  • Whitepaper: 5 Reasons to get physical with access control
    While many network security systems are now built to support IT best practices and standards, physical access control systems (PACS) have traditionally been designed without IT professionals in mind. Learn how these limitations are changing, as a new breed of affordable, web-based physical access control systems are emerging.
  • Case Study: Georgia Tech Police Department
    Learn how the Georgia Tech Police Department uses a web-based physical access control system (PACS) to manage facility access from any web browser, partition role-based access priviledges by building, synchronize with campus-wide identity management systems and reduces their total cost of ownership.
  • Pearson unveils tablet ELL assessment system
    A new tablet-based assessment developed by Pearson will specifically target English Language Learners (ELLs) in order to help them build English language skills and succeed on summative assessments. With the assessment system, called TELL (Test of English Language Learning), students watch video clips and interact with pictures and words, then answer questions out loud. They listen, write, read and speak—all with no mark-ups or grading by teachers. TELL screens, diagnoses and monitors each ELL student’s progress throughout the school year. Responses—written and spoken—are automatically scored by Pearson’s automated scoring technologies Fully scalable, TELL can be used with just one student at a time, a small to large group, or for whole-class administration at the school or district level. The assessment covers all four foundational language skills—listening, speaking, reading and writing and is aligned to standards, such as Common Core. “English language learners are the fastest growing student population in the United States and 60 percent of those students are in elementary school. When we talked to school and district assessment directors as well as English language teaching specialists from around the country, they emphasized the critical need for a new and engaging approach to measuring English language proficiency that accurately diagnoses students’ needs and monitors their progress,” said Alistair Van Moere, Ph.D., head of Pearson’s Assessment Product Solutions.
  • These amazing kits make electronics simple and fun for every student
    Very young students often have a hard time engaging meaningfully in electronics projects. Sure, most middle school kids can learn the function of basic electronic components and follow a set of instructions to create a basic circuit on a breadboard. Often, however, their work suffers from the mistakes, short-circuits, and sloppiness that plague any novice. More limiting than the struggle to keep bare wires from accidentally brushing each other, is the wall that most students hit after they create the alarm circuit or lie detector that they built from the schematic in the textbook. While their imaginations are ripe with ideas of things they might like to build, most young students lack the fundamental knowledge to push beyond the canned circuits provided by their teacher and to create something original. By limiting a student to the re-creation of pre-designed circuits, we are teaching her how to pay attention to detail, how to carefully follow instructions, and how to perform a variety of specific tasks such as stripping the insulation from wire and how to install an IC into a breadboard. If our aspirations for our hypothetical student involve work on an assembly line, this will be all the training she needs. But if we want a little more for our kids, we will need to set the bar higher. By following instructions to build pre-designed circuits, our student is not learning how to visualize how her idea might operate in the physical world. She isn’t learning how to brainstorm various design ideas, test them out and persist through failure. We are not asking her to create.
Forgot your Password?

Please enter the e-mail address for your account. A verification token will be sent to you. Once you have received the token, you will be able to choose a new password for your account.